Recent Posts

Seriously Awesome Overview of the History of Stress
Published 11/3/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Camille Morgan
This article by R.S. Lazarus titled "From Psychological Stress to the Emotions: A History of Changing Outlooks" was really interesting.  The first part of the article reads like a great story.  Stress is one of those words that we tend to throw around all the time without bothering to define what we actually mean by the word.  Academia has gone through many definitions of stress and probably will continue to do so.  Still, this article gives a good history of all the different ways in which academicians, especially those North American psychologists, have treated the phenomena we call stress and how these views are tied to historical events and broader paradigm shifts.  I find Lazarus' definition of stress and coping particularly useful to my study of culture shock.  Specifically, I think the transactional theory linking appraisal, stress, and coping might be useful in understanding the psychological processes involved in Porges'... read more ❯
Polyvagal Theory and Psychiatric Disorders
Published 11/3/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Camille Morgan
I  was first introduced to Porges' Polyvagal Theory by Leslie Heywood's (2011) article "Affective Infrastructures: Toward a Cultural Neuropsychology of Sport."  It's really interesting to read Porges' article "The Polyvagal Theory: phylogenetic contributions to social behavior" afterwards.  Heywood used this theory in her understanding of sport models but after reading the original article I now see the theory's potential to explain social behavior on the whole.   In regards to culture shock, my specific interest at this moment, there are many quotable sections in the article that shed light on what might be happening neurophysiologically.  If you can overlook the absence of Oxford commas, then give this article a look.  It provides a workable framework for understanding psychiatric disorders and sociality in general. read more ❯
Alabama Midwife Litagation
Published 11/3/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Angela Ray
This is article is about the history of midwifery in Alabama. It also expands upon what Dr. Lynn mentioned regarding black midwives in Alabama. Skip to page 11 for details specifically about Alabama. http://core.kmi.open.ac.uk/download/pdf/10677946.pdf read more ❯
Fashionable Learning
Published 11/2/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Andrea Roulaine
Susan Brand, Rita Dunn, and Fran Greb, in their article, Learning Styles of Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Who are They and How Can We Teach Them?, claimed two specially trained researches examined the learning styles of third-through twelfth-grade students who had been, A: diagnosed with ADHA and B: was receiving prescription drugs, to identify learning styles of these children. Both researchers used the Dunn and Dunn learning Model and they identified individual’s reactions to each 21 elements while concentrating on new and difficult academic knowledge or skills. Those included their reactions to several things. The list as follows; One, their immediate instructional environment- sounds vs silence; bright light vs soft lighting; warm vs cool temp; and formal vs informal seating. Two, own emotionality motivation, persistence, responsibility, and preference for structure vs choices. Three, their sociological preferences for learning – alone, with peers, with either a collegial or authoritative... read more ❯
The Seven Wonders of the Mind
Published 11/2/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Andrea Roulaine
Howard Gardner of Harvard has identified seven distinct intelligences. According to Gardener, he developed a theory from cognitive research to which students possess different kinds of minds and therefore learn, remember, perform, and understand in different ways. Howard Gardener formulated a list of seven intelligences, the first two have been typically valued in schools; the next three are usually associated with the arts; and the final two are what Gardner called ‘personal intelligences’, according to the article. The list as follows: Linguistic intelligence – involves sensitivity to spoken and written language, the ability to learn languages, and the capacity to use language to accomplish certain goals. Logical-mathematical intelligence – consists of the capacity to analyze problems logically, carry out mathematical operations, and investigates issues scientifically. Musical Intelligence – involves skill in the performance, composition, and appreciation of musical patterns. Bodily-kinesthetic intelligence – entails the potential of using one’s whole body... read more ❯
“A Playful Mind”
Published 11/2/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Andrea Roulaine
Dr. Jaak Panksepp and Sheri Six of Washington University suggest that free play, which includes rough-and-tumble activities, running, jumping, and play fighting, are increasing recognized as essential components of a child’s development. Both human and animal studies have provided evidence that periods of play improve social skills, impulse inhibition and attention and result in specific neurochemical and dendritic changes in many neurons, especially in those brain areas in which ADHA children are deficient.         Therefore, long term provision of more opportunities for physical play may be an effective, non-medicinal therapy for reducing some of the disruptive behaviors of ADHA and facilitating brain development in children diagnosed with ADHA, according to the article. Humans are born ready in take in sensory information, to learn and to grow, brains do not come fully encoded and knowledgeable of the variety of experiences in which a person may encounter throughout his or her life. Much... read more ❯
“Playful Learning”
Published 11/2/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Andrea Roulaine
According to Peter Gray, in his article, Play as a Foundation for Hunter-Gatherer Social Existence, education is essential to the human condition and people everywhere depend for their survival on skills, knowledge, and ideas passed from generation to generation; and such passing along is, by definition, education. Because of education, we are the benefactors (and the victims) of the inventions and ideas of our ancestors. This is true of hunter-gatherer cultures too. Hunter-gatherer adults, however, do not concern themselves much with their children’s education. They assume that children will learn what they need to know through their own, self-directed exploration and play, according to the article. Peter Gray suggests that hunter-gatherers promoted, through cultural means, the playful side of their human nature and this made possible their egalitarian, nonautocratic, intensely cooperative ways of living. Hunter-gatherer bands, with their fluid membership, are likened to social-play groups, which people could freely join... read more ❯
Community Commons: Perceived Stress Scale
Published 11/1/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Angela Ray
Community Commons offers a pdf of the Perceived Stress Scale, along with one-page intro, including background, validity, and a Norm Table. This is the scale chosen to administer to pregnant women throughout this experiment. http://www.communitycommons.org/wp-content/uploads/bp-attachments/29658/perceived-stress-scale.pdf read more ❯
ADHA: “Changing Gears”
Published 11/1/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Andrea Roulaine
George Halasz and Alasdair L A Vance, in their article, Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in Children: moving forward with divergent perspectives, claimed that the US National Institutes of Health released a statement, in the year 2000, that the diversity of opinions about ADHA raises questions concerning the literal existence of the disorder, whether it can be reliably diagnosed. And Dr. Peter Jensen, from the US National Institute of Mental Health, stated that according to the panelists, ADHA remains of an “unproven” status and should give pause to both researchers and clinicians who may have reified ADHA as a ‘thing’ or ‘true entity’. No clinical or laboratory test can validly and reliably distinguish children with ADHA from those without ADHA and given the heterogeneity of the condition as currently defined, it seems unlikely that such a test will emerge, according to the article. Halasz and Vance suggest, since there to no... read more ❯
ADHD: “To Be or not to Be”
Published 10/31/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Andrea Roulaine
Angela Ine Frank-Briggs, from the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, at the University of Harcourt Teaching Hospital in Port Harcourt, Nigeria, defines Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHA, as a neurobehavioral developmental disorder, primarily characterized by the co-existence of attention problems and hyperactivity which effects about 3 to 5% of children worldwide, with symptoms starting before 7 years of age and in about 50% of cases continuing into adult hood. According to Briggs, in her article, Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHA), and to the American Academy of Child Adolescent Psychiatry, considers the following to be present before a child is to have ADHA: behaviors must continue for at least 6 months, and the symptoms must create a real handicap in a least two of the following areas of the child’s life: the classroom, on the playground, at home, in the community, or in social settings. Over the years, the... read more ❯

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