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Get Comfortable being Uncomfortable
Published 9/5/2017 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author lmcguire
Hi, I'm Lauren and I'm always trying to push my own limits. I'm a senior working towards a B.S. in Psychology with minors in music and philosophy with a mind and brain concentration. My whole life is dedicated to making myself uncomfortable, because that's how we grow as people. In high school, I was really shy and awkward and trying to blend in as much as possible. Really nothing special and really ok with it. But one day my band director (the whole shy and awkward thing definitely lends itself to being a band nerd, trust me) bestowed on... read more ❯
Flowing Down Mountains
Published 9/4/2017 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author rjelse
I grew up in Durango, Colorado, and completed my bachelor's degree in Boulder, CO, and master's degree in Fort Collins, CO. Snow and mountains are in my blood. My parents joke that I've been skiing since I was three months old, when my dad would ski with me tucked into the front of his jacket. Alpine skiing, telemark skiing, and backcountry skiing have been some of my main hobbies throughout my life. Some of the reasons for this include community, being in nature, and enjoyable exercise, but the main reason that I enjoy skiing is because it puts me in a state of "flow." The concept of flow, pioneered by psychologist Mihály Csíkszentmihályi, is a state in which an individual is focused and fully absorbed in some task, generally one that is both challenging and rewarding (2014). Organized by Tinbergen's four questions, there are a number of reasons why behaviors leading... read more ❯
Playing With Play-Doh: The Reemergence of a Childhood Pastime
Published 9/4/2017 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author apgibson
Hello, my name is Abbie, and I'm a senior at UA. I'm majoring in Biology and Spanish with a minor in Anthropology. My hobbies tend to lean more towards the arts: playing flute, painting, drawing, and perhaps the least popular amongst our age group, sculpting with Play-Doh. Commonly thought of as an easy arts and crafts activity for young children, using play-doh has quickly become a valuable hobby as I’ve grown older. Opposite to most, I seem to have grown into this habit instead of abandoning it with age. I find that it has stress-relieving and relaxing properties and provides a creative outlet to relieve any frustrations or anxieties. This particular hobby had a fairly uneventful beginning. Walking through a Target store one day, I walked by a display of Play-Doh and spontaneously decided to purchase a few tubs, recalling how... read more ❯
Monika Wanis - Why I like extreme sports!
Published 9/4/2017 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author mewanis
Hi! My name is Monika Wanis, I am a second year Biocultural Medical anthropology graduate student. I am originally from Cairo, Egypt but have lived in Columbus, Ohio for the past 20 years. I attended The Ohio State University for my undergraduate degree in Anthropology, Psychology, Integrative Medicine and Neuroscience. I speak Arabic, English, Spanish, and Russian. I am also currently a TA for 2 sections of Cultural Anthropology. My favorite hobby is doing any extreme sport. I went skydiving on August 27th of this year for the second time for my birthday! According to Tinbergen's 4 Questions Why, here is why I like extreme sports: Proximate Causes Mechanism - Physiologically, extreme sports often involve behaviors that increase your heart rate and produce a surge in hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline and neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine and dopamine. These... read more ❯
Red or Green?
Published 9/4/2017 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author aeguitar
I was born and raised in Las Cruces, New Mexico. It’s hard to pick out what I miss most about this gorgeous little city nestled in the desert. Perhaps it’s the overwhelming friendliness--the way that people aren’t afraid to joke and laugh with total strangers. Maybe it’s the 350 days of sunshine a year and the blissful ability to perceive the 70's as brisk weather. Or, it might just be that little green pepper, the one that tastes like pure happiness and instantly transports me back home--Hatch green chile. I am about to make a claim that will sound utterly ridiculous to most people and completely mundane to any New Mexican: My favorite hobby is tracking down and consuming Hatch green chile. [caption id="attachment_724" align="alignright"... read more ❯
Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
Published 9/4/2017 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author vlmorgan3
I feel a little silly writing a personal post about travel- like the typical millennial blog about why you should travel to every country before you turn 30 (if you are blessed with money and time). Honestly, I'm not sure I would even call traveling a hobby and I don't think I would consider myself a "wandering soul" or someone with the "travel bug." I am perfectly happy nesting in my bed during my vacations. Most of the hobbies I consider essential to how I define myself are personal, and, usually, things that no body knows about me. That's what makes them special. However, I do think traveling has had some impact on the person that I've become and the way that I view things. Plus, it's the only thing I have original images of so.... Historically: Ancestrally, I suppose... read more ❯
Final Day at Arcadia Spring 2017 - Food! A Team Teaching Effort
So for our last day at TMSE we talked about food and how it is a thing that gathers everyone together in all cultures. But, first we started off with a short quiz about everything we covered in the past weeks at TMSE to determine what information was being absorbed and remembered. Each of our little clans had some very good scores on the quiz and the top three individuals who scored the highest were rewarded with gummy worms and gummy bears. Next, we went into the PowerPoint lecture which discussed foods from different areas around the globe as well as how these foods related to the culture they came from. One of our examples was the Margherita pizza, named after Queen Margherita, and we discussed how she liked it because it reminded her of the Italian flag. We also talked about how, in Indonesia, a... read more ❯
Escuela Shuabb
Published 4/2/2017 in The Schema
Author Greg Batchelder
“Good morning” “GOOD MORNING!” “What is your name?” “My name is BELLA!” “Your name is Bella. And where do you live Bella?” “I live in SHUABB!” “I love you Bella.” Bella is six years old. She is one of 15 students, ranging from six years of age to 13, who attend Shuabb elementary. I am a gringo. I am working on my doctorate in anthropology from the University of Alabama. I work at the elementary school every weekday. The students here take classes in their native Bribri language and culture. They also have classes in traditional subjects such as math, science, geography, history, and Spanish. I teach English, supervise an ethnography project in which the older students are creating video blogs, and offer workshops in other subjects ranging from ethnobotany to cosmology. The community of Shuabb lies within the poorest district in the country of Costa Rica. The school receives minimal... read more ❯
AiE in Madagascar IV: Centre ValBio & Night Walking with Mouse Lemurs
See previous post I, II, and III in this series, or related posts to this month-long trip here and here. Note in our previous episode that I wasn't sure if I had meetings set up, with who, or about what when I arrived at Ranomafana. I received a message from Dustin that I had a 10AM appointment, but he had not been able to confirm, so I should just ask for Maya Moore or Pascal Rabeson. When I arrived at Centre ValBio (CVB), Maya had left for Tana and Pascal was in another village until later in the day. Nevertheless, I was able to get an appointment for later in the day with him. In the meantime, I explored the village, taking photos. I came across one of the silk making coops. I couldn't afford to buy a scarf but was given permission to take photos. However, I overstayed my welcome, taking so many... read more ❯
AiE in Madagascar III: Road to Ranomafana
See previous post 1 and post 2 in this series, or related posts to this month-long trip here and here. The drive to Ranomafana is about 12 hours. After experiencing the Tana roads, I thought maybe it was close via bad roads, but it's really 12 hours in a 4WD at relatively high speed but through winding roads. For 12 hours, I was tossed side to side, tires screeching on the road. I was very passive in this adventure, which is ironic when I think that this project arose because the TMSE PTA asked me to offer an anthropology course several years ago when my kids were in 3rd grade. I didn't want to do it because I didn't have the time to take on any more service, but I wanted to do it because I wanted to be able to share what I do with my kids and help their school.... read more ❯