Recent Posts

More to West and East at a Glance
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Bryce Fry
Akechia, Senju, Kikuchi, Hasegawa, and Hietanen give a solid method of assessing eye contact between individuals in “Attention to eye contact in the West and East: Autonomic responses and evaluative ratings.” In particular, I like that they give participants a degree of control over the duration of eye contact, as well as including self-evaluative measures of participants affective states over the course of the trials. They incorporated the quantitative and qualitative measures well and integrated them easily enough in the conclusion. Their point about eye contact being a social interaction and consisting of some give and take between two subjects seemed an important experimental point. When designing studies that look at social interactions like these, they cannot be too contrived or they lose part of their cultural context. Having a bit of give and take, a more relaxed atmosphere in the study, even done as a formal part of the method,... read more ❯
Different Regional Gray Matter Loss in Recent Onset PTSD and Non PTSD after a Single Prolonged Trauma Exposure
Published 11/5/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Carson Patterson
This study had quite a bit to offer when it came to understanding the implantation that PTSD has on the brain. It seem that the in people that had survived a trauma the volume of gray matter in the brain correlates negatively with the CAPS, or  Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. This means that their score, which indicates increasing severity of symptom expression, is shown to increase as their gray matter decreases. This article provides insight into which parts of the brain are associated with PTSD  and how MRI can serve to aid in study and diagnosis. Link: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0048298 read more ❯
Efficacy of Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy in the Treatment of PTSD: A Systematic Review
Published 11/5/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Carson Patterson
This article really informed my thoughts on the different methods of therapy that can be made available to PTSD. The therapeutic aspect of PTSD plays an integral role in my proposal. Therapies like the use of personal narrative and rationalization seem affective, however these methods seek to employ a level of realism that virtual reality innately has. Link: http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0048469 read more ❯
Anthropology and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Veterans: An Interview with Erin Finley
Published 11/5/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Carson Patterson
This dialogue between Finley and Lende was high informative on the clinical characterization of  PTSD as a disorder. Additionally, Finleys insight into coping mechanisms was extremely informative for the purposed of informing my research proposal. Link: http://blogs.plos.org/neuroanthropology/2011/07/18/anthropology-and-post-traumatic-stress-disorder-among-veterans-an-interview-with-erin-finley/ read more ❯
Prospective Study of Police Officer Spouse/Partners: A New Pathway to Secondary Trauma and Relationship Violence?
Published 11/5/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Carson Patterson
I found this article to be extremely informative in exploring the interpersonal relationships with PTSD sufferers. This article covered a study done on police officers and their significant others. It looked at instances of violence that occur in relationships after experience of trauma. The instances of violence were more statistically related to officers that had experienced a secondary trauma. This leads to an assumption that prolonged exposure has a profound effect. This nicely correlates to the military paradigm of my proposal. Link: http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0100663 read more ❯
Neuroscience
Published 11/5/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Mindy Russo
Still trying to figure out just how the nervous system works? I know I certainly am. I actually took a class last year on neurobiology, and the textbook for the class has been a fantastic reference source for multiple other classes. It does a great job explaining a lot of processes and structures that may otherwise be extremely confusing. This book includes morphology, biology, pharmacology, and pathologies of the nervous system. That includes eyes, spinal chord, brain, and nerves. Topics that we have covered in this class, such as mirror neurons, conditioning, PTSD, and pain reception are covered in this book. I highly recommend it as a reference source. Purves, Dale, George J. Augustine, David Fitzpatrick, William C. Hall, Anthony-Samuel LaMantia, Leonard E. White, eds. 2012 Neuroscience. Sunderland, MA: SinauerAssociates read more ❯
For when you're about to drink a cup of coffee and you realize it's your fourth cup that day...
Published 11/5/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Mindy Russo
Part of my research design involves participants rating their dosage of caffeine in any given day. Not everyone knows how much caffeine they are consuming at any given time. This article has a great table for relative caffeine content for common beverages. This was very valuable for thinking about my survey. http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/healthier-ways-to-get-your-caffeine read more ❯
TM. Tan. Laundry.
Published 11/5/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Camille Morgan
Multiple studies have shown the efficacy of TM as an intervention for treating stress. One blind study by MacLean et al. (1997) took a random sample of men ranging in age from 18-32 and tested them in a laboratory setting for acute effects of a variety of stressful tasks. The stressors were mental arithmetic, mirror star-tracing, and isometric handgrip. Measurements of hormones were taken before intervention as a baseline and after participating in TM or stress education classes (SEC) for a total of four months (twice, daily). After running a t test and ANCOVA, researchers found that the TM group's cortisol levels significantly decreased in both baseline and overall amounts and that cortisol response was markedly more sensitive for the posttest in comparison to the pretest (MacLean et al. 1997:381). read more ❯
Neuropsychological functioning in posttraumatic stress disorder following forced displacement in older adults and their offsprings
Published 11/5/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Carson Patterson
This article looked at the memory deficits that can be caused by PTSD in a comparative study that looked at PTSD suffers, non-PTSD sufferers, and additionally their offspring in an attempt to ascertain the affect that PTSD had on cognitive abilities and depressive symptoms but also whether or not those affect translated into the lives of their offspring. What i found to be intriguing here was the methodology.  The researchers looked at two generations, the parent and the offspring, and three distinct groups, PTSD sufferers, non-PTSD sufferers, and a group which had experienced no trauma. They also administered three separate test to determine placement; Structured Clinical Interview, Beck-Depression Inventory, and the Post-traumatic Diagnostic Scale. The result of the study were found to be null, with the only significant differences between groups resulting from the PDS scores. The offspring generation also seemed to be particularly resilient, with the offspring of PTSD... read more ❯
Trauma: The Post Trauma Enviroment
Published 11/5/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Carson Patterson
Daniel  Lende expounds on the importance of the post trauma environment on the reintegration process.  The focus is is less on the traumatic origins and more about the different  ways that the post traumatic environment can positively or negatively affect the traumatized individuals' ability to successfully rejoin their community. He touches on a very basic example from an experiment performed by Paul Plotsky on mother rats an their pups. The experiment looked at how the trauma of separation could be mitigated by allowing the mother rat control of the environment in which the reunion with her pups took place. If the mother rat was allowed to escape the location where she and her pups were originally separated and to seek out new locations for reunion in different room of her enclosure then she was better able to care for her pups when they were returned to her. Even after repeated... read more ❯

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