Recent Posts

Impact of Event Scale-Revised
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Lauren Nolan
The Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) will be utilized because the population sample will most likely be older adults, the format is simple, the scoring is in sub-sections and overall, and it suits the research topic and sample well.  In their article “Impact of Event Scale-Revised” Christianson and Marren explain why the IES-R is better suited for an older population than the IES although the Impact of Event Scale is also a good test. Their article also gives an example format of the test and how to score it which is helpful. read more ❯
Bereavement and the Impact of Event Scale (IES)
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Lauren Nolan
For my research proposal I will be using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised as one of my measures to understand psychological stress in the bereaved.  In the research paper by Pennebaker, Mayne, and Francis (1997) “Linguistic Predictors of Adaptive Bereavement” the Impact of Event Scale is just one of the measurements used to understand grief in people who have lost their partners to HIV/AIDS.  The scale helps to understand how a recent relatively traumatic event is affecting an individual’s day to day functioning in their everyday life, emotions, and thoughts. read more ❯
The History of the Rosary and some Physiological Benefits
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Lauren Nolan
I found the historical information in the article “Effect of rosary prayer and yoga mantras on autonomic cardiovascular rhythms: comparative study” as well as the information on rhythmic breathing to be helpful.  Bernardi et al. (2001) described how recitation of the rosary (a repetitive Roman Catholic prayer) and yoga mantras slow respiration to a specific rhythm which can benefit heart rate and blood pressure.  While, the effects of meditative practices such as yoga have been more widely studied repetitive and meditative prayer have not been studied as much.  This paper was able to investigate a slight historical link between the two practices as well as a possible hypothesis for why both practices may be of physiological benefit to practitioners. Bernardi, L., Sleight, P., Bandinelli, G., Cencetti, S., Fattorini, L., Wdowczyc-Szulc, J., & Lagi, A. (2001). Effect of rosary prayer and yoga mantras on autonomic cardiovascular rhythms: comparative study. Bmj, 323(7327), 1446-1449. read more ❯
“Sweatin Pressure”
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Andrea Roulaine
SCR (skin conductance response) is highly sensitive to emotions in some people. Fear, anger, startled response, orienting response and sexual feelings are among the reactions which may produce similar skin conductance responses. SCR is widely used in psychological research due to its low cost and high utility. Oftentimes, the galvanic skin responses are combined with recording of heart rate, respiratory rate, and blood pressure because they are all autonomic dependent variables. read more ❯
Psychological Distress and Burden Among Female Partners of Combat Veterans With PTSD
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Carson Patterson
This article focused on the partner/spouse relationship that I am currently looking at for my proposal, if it is a bit narrow for my taste. It is specific only to women as the partners. However it did delve in to several interesting aspects such as threat appraisal and to  the partners control over the veteran's  emotional difficulties to involvement in treatment. Additionally it informed me as to an interesting test for assessing burden an psychological state, BSI-18. Link: http://ovidsp.tx.ovid.com/sp-3.13.1a/ovidweb.cgi?QS2=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 read more ❯
A Perspective on Craving
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Genevieve Miller
I found the article written by J. A. Brewer, "Craving to quit: Psychological models and neurobiological mechanisms of mindfulness training as treatments for addictions," to contain a useful description of addiction and craving. One of the contributing factors to addiction is the formation of associative memories between the addiction and positive and negative affective states.  A smoker remembers that smoking when stressed helps him to relax, and that when he doesn't smoke he feels stressed, so he is likely to keep smoking.  This in turn forms an addictive loop in which the smoker becomes stuck. Craving is the urge to act on the desire for the addiction.  When a smoker hasn't smoked in a while, he will begin to actively seek out a cigarette and will not feel like himself until after he has smoked.  However, it is important to note that craving is not a response to the object of addiction;... read more ❯
Military-related PTSD and intimate relationships: From description to theory-driven research and intervention development
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Carson Patterson
This article truly complemented the ethnographic aspect of my proposal. The aim of the is was to look at the intimate relationships that veterans suffering from PTSD maintain and the negative effect it has on those relationships in order to provide insight for later treatment. They in effect paved the way into exploring the true outcome of PTSD, not only with regard to the individual sufferer but to their families as well.  This particular study did not touch on children but it did reference study of the interplay between PTSD sufferers and their offspring  as a future avenue for study. Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272735809001196 read more ❯
Stick to the Familiar
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Genevieve Miller
I recently read "Self-regulatory deficits associated with unpracticed mindfulness strategies for coping with acute pain" by D. R. Evans.  While mindfulness meditation has been shown to decrease pain perception, it turns out that it can actually be harmful in the short run.  Using this strategy of self regulation is unfamiliar and strange to most people, and can deplete the will-power to resist temptation.  For this reason, I think a more familiar pain-coping strategy might be better suited to addicts who are already struggling with self-regulation.  This is why I am interested to find out if the addict's addiction can become a mantra that will help addicts tolerate pain. read more ❯
Remember, remember
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Bryce Fry
Giving a detailed account of the history and use of the Wechsler memory scale, and offering improvements on the method of comparing immediate and delayed memory, Tulsky, Chelune, and Price's “Development of a new delayed memory index for the WMS-III” is invalvuable for understanding the use of the Wechsler memory scale. In particular the analysis of the test and how it can be adapted to suit the experimental purpose should play into the method of the proposal. Of particular interest are the revise General Memory Index (GMI) and Immediate Memory Index (IMI) that allow more transparent comparison. Having a means of comparing long term and short term memory is essential to a study of attention, encoding, and learning, especially in the classroom. Without them, the study would not be significant or interesting in the broader context of education and retention. Tulsky, D. S., Chelune, G. J., & Price, L. R. (2004).... read more ❯
Don't Give Opium to Addicts
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Genevieve Miller
While reading "Addiction and the Treatment of Pain" written by P. Ziegler, I realized one potential my experiment could have to help addicts.  Most pain medications are opiate based, and these medications, while useful, can trigger relapse or new addictions in addicts.  For this reason it is important to find alternatives to treat pain in addicts.  I hypothesize that addicts might be able to harness the focus they use on their addiction to become less sensitive to pain. read more ❯

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