Recent Posts

Video Games Enhance Cognition
Published 11/7/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Shannon Sproston
While I've found nothing that compares video game styles cross-culturally, there has been a recent surge of research concerning Western action games and their influence on cognitive and perceptual function. Here's an article detailing video game training for adults. Video gaming can potentially be rehabilitative. If you have no idea what the differences are between Japanese and American games, this interview can give you an idea . read more ❯
A Dissertation on Midwifery & Women's Autonomy
Published 11/7/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Angela Ray
This is a dissertation on midwifery and it feminist power. It turned up in my search queries on "midwifery" and "Alabama" because it was published at UA, but I don't think it's quite what I'm looking for -- bit more focused on reproductive rights, feminism, and destroying the medical-industrial complex.  However, some paragraphs provide some useful statistics and information, and also point to other sources that could be useful. Prime usefulness is in the section starting on page 40. I didn't read much before or beyond that section, to be honest. http://purl.lib.ua.edu/13873   read more ❯
College and Stress
I needed an article that talked about stress, and that validated my choice to study college students as opposed to another group. One word can describe this article: bingo. This article goes into detail describing how and why college students are so stressed out all the time. The article also illustrates some side effects of stress, such as loneliness and anxiety. Wright, J. J. (1967). Reported personal stress sources and adjustment of entering freshmen. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 14(4), 371-373. doi:10.1037/h0024750   read more ❯
Social support
One of the main problems I encountered when brainstorming about my proposal was determining a way to measure social support. Luckily I found an article describing the Social Support Questionnare (SSQ) which provides quantitative data about the amount and perceived quality of support received. The questionnaire asks about the number of people on whom one could receive support from in a variety of situations. It also asks participants to rank their satisfaction with this support. The numbers are then averaged to provide a singular score.   Sarason, I. G., Sarason, B. R., Shearin, E. N., & Pierce, G. R. (1987). A brief measure of social support: Practical and theoretical implications. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 4(4), 497-510. read more ❯
Somatic Anxiety and Blood Pressure
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Ashley Arzola
In order to measure the somatic anxiety in the participants, blood pressure and heart rates would be taken. The American Heart Association and Mayo Clinc provided me with a probable testing criteria in my proposal.  Blood pressure is the force of blood against the walls of the arteries during relaxation and contraction. It is typically recorded as two numbers in a ration, systolic which is the top number, measures the pressure in the arteries when the heart beats (heart muscles are contracted) and diastolic which in turn is the bottom number measures the pressure in the arteries between heartbeats (when the muscles are in a resting state between beats)." (Mayo Clinic, 2014). Mayo Clinic 2014. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings. Electronic document. <http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HighBloodPressure/AboutHighBloodPressure/Understanding-Blood-Pressure-Readings_UCM_301764_Article.jsp> read more ❯
Anxiety, A Normal Stress Reaction
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Ashley Arzola
To get a basic feel for the psychological issues behind anxiety, The National Institute for Mental Health helped with the background information and a start into the neurological reasonings behind why we react the way we do to stress.  "Anxiety is a normal reaction to stress. It is used as a coping mechanism, for memories, fear, or dealing with stress and pressure." These symptoms allows one to get into the mind and visualize what an athlete is experiencing and further my investigation into the SNS and ANS systems.   National Institute for Mental Health 2014. Anxiety. Electronic Document. <http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/anxiety- disorders/index.shtml> read more ❯
Cognitive Anxiety and Somatic Anxiety in a Negative Relationship
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Ashley Arzola
Since a person reacted to stress both somatically and cognitively Martens article on the Multi-dimensional Anxiety Theory adds another idea to the mix. Research has found a relationship between cognitive anxiety and somatic anxiety within a person creates a negative linear relationship. Meaning that somatic anxiety will create the inverted-U as stated before, but as cognitive anxiety increases, performance in the individual will decrease (Martens 1990).  Martens, R. et al. 1990. The Development of the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2). Human Kinetics read more ❯
Anxiety Arousal and Performance Issues
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Ashley Arzola
This article helped greatly in understanding the different levels of stress. Yerkes gave a detailed breakdown on the Inverted-U Hypothesis on the relationship between anxiety and performance. This hypothesis indicated that as arousal increases, then performance also increases and improves but only up to a certain point. If the individuals arousal is pushed beyond the max point then performance will have the inverted affect and diminishes, creating an inverted U shape. Yerkes and Dodson 1908. The relation of strength of stimulus to rapidity of habit formation. Journal of of Neurological Psychology   read more ❯
LGB familial support.
This article doesn't exactly relate to my topic, but it deals with stress and social support for those in a minority group. I had some reservations about using this article, because negative social effects of being a vegan are hardly comparable to the struggles faced by the LGBTQ community. Once I read another one of my articles, I was able to find a connection between familial support that, while it is not quite the same, it can be compared as both groups can rejected by their families. I found this interesting because it discovered that close, familial support meant more in reducing stress levels than peer support or overall satisfaction with the support. This has slight implications in how social support for vegans might differ from non-vegans.   Burton, C. L., Bonanno, G. A., & Hatzenbuehler, M. L. (2014). Familial social support predicts a reduced cortisol response to stress in sexual minority young adults. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 47(0), 241-245.... read more ❯
Anxiety in Athletes Hindering Performance Levels
Published 11/6/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Ashley Arzola
"While most athletes recognize that some nervous tension is normal and important to performance, athletes struggling with performance anxiety worry about losing control of their nerves, preventing them from performing well." Since sporting events can cause anxiety in athletes causing someone to react both somatically and cognitively. I will be using sport psychologist, Jeff Greenwald's, information on the problem of athletes dealing with their bodies' physiological response to having the nerves. In other research conducted I have found the inverted-U theory to help understand performance when compared to anxiety and response thresholds. Goldberg, Jamie 2010. The athlete's anxiety: Marin sports psychologists tackle the treatable problem of performance-inhibiting nervousness. Electronic document, http://www.marinij.com/ci_15713859?source=pkg read more ❯

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