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UA Anthropology Publications from Fall 2014
Published 12/30/2014 in Bama Anthro Blog Network
Author Christopher Lynn
Blitz, John H., C. Fred Andrus, and Lauren E. Downs Schlerochronological Detection of Seasonality at a Late Woodland Mound. American Antiquity 79(4):697-711. Brown, Ian W. Time Travelers in England: Americans in Search of Salt. Tuscaloosa, AL: Borgo Publishing. Dressler, William W. and Kathryn S. Oths Social Survey Methods in Anthropological Fieldwork. In: Handbook of Methods in Cultural Anthropology. 2nd Ed., H. Russell Bernard and Clarence C. Gravlee, Eds., Altamira Press. González Faraco, Juan Carlos and Michael D. Murphy El Rocío de Antoine de Latour. Exvoto 4(3): 253-281. Herndon, Kelsey E., G. Zaro, B.A. Houk, S. Mitchell, and E. Gallis The 2014 Excavations of the Chan Chich Dynastic Architecture Project. In The 2014 Season of the Chan Chich Archaeological Project, edited by B.A. Houk, pp. 31-68. Papers of the Chan Chich Archaeological Project, Number 8. Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work, Texas Tech University, Lubbock. Knight, Vernon James Taking Stock of Social Theory in Southeastern Archaeology. Southeastern Archaeology 33(2):206-207. Kosiba, Steve and Andrew... read more ❯
Hi, Tech! Updates and Apps to Enhance Workflow
Published 12/28/2014 in Bama Anthro Blog Network
Author Christopher Lynn
After many years of loyal service, the database built in the Stone Age of the internet (the '80s) by our own esteemed technology advance guardsman, Professor Emeritus Jim Bindon, was retired by necessity. It was built in ColdFusion, essentially the Beta of databases, and was no longer supported. Fortunately, we were able to have it transferred to another server and service and are now up and running again with institutional support. Thank you, Jim, for your technological innovations and many years of maintaining them for our behalf. In addition to tried and true wonders of technology to streamline our workflow are new innovations. One I've become fond of in 2014 is the vBookz PDF Voice Reader app. This app reads PDFs that have been processed with OCR text recognition software. It comes at a cost of $4.99 from the Apple Store and can be used with a female or male voice.... read more ❯
How do you remember Jewish lives when nothing remains?
Published 12/28/2014 in Uncovering Jewish Heritage
Author Marysia Galbraith
Author Marysia Galbraith has kindly let the Bama Anthro Blog Network repost from the original site here. A defining question of my study is turning out to be: How do you remember Jewish lives in Poland when nothing remains? Or when there are only scattered traces? I certainly started with next to nothing when I began the search for my own family story. Since then, I have found so much—most extraordinarily many living relatives. I’m gathering up the fragments of the past—a half remembered story, a photograph, a birth record. And pieced together, something fuller is emerging. It’s still impossibly far from the rich lives that have passed, but it nevertheless gives me a much better sense of where I come from. All this resonates with an article I read in the Atlantic, which although it is about the tension between science and belief in God, makes the point that the more knowledge... read more ❯
Extemporanous Talks and Other Exciting Guest Lectures
Published 12/28/2014 in Bama Anthro Blog Network
Author Christopher Lynn
The Department of Anthropology was lucky to have several visitors who gave planned and extemporaneous talks in the spring 2014. On February 21, the Anthropology Club co-hosted a FABBL (Friday Afternoon Brown Bag Lunch) talk with Dr. Mark Moberg from the University of Southern Alabama entitled "How 'Fair' is Fair Trade: Contrasting Views of Economic Morality among Caribbean Banana Farmers." Dr. Moberg is the editor-in-chief of Human Organization, the research journal for the Society for Applied Anthropology. His work focuses on trade, globalization, and political economy in the Caribbean and Latin America. As part of our Extemporaneous Talks series (ET #3), Dr. Jim Hall, formerly of UA's New College and now of Rochester Institute of Technology, gave a talk on February 24, 2014 about UA anthropologist Solon Kimball and the Talladega Study. Kimball, who was a founding member of the American... read more ❯
Marysia Galbraith and Clay Nelson in the News
Published 12/28/2014 in Bama Anthro Blog Network
Author Christopher Lynn
As covered in The Crimson White and A&S Desktop News, Dr. Marysia Galbraith has received a third Fulbright award to continue her longitudinal study of identity in Poland. Dr. Galbraith, who has worked in Poland for over 20 years, was awarded the Fulbright to investigate whether Jews in Poland self-identify as Jewish and Polish. This study expands on ideas outlined in her recent book, Being and Becoming European in Poland: European Integration and Self-Identity, which examines Polish self-identity as part of the European Union. As highlighted in the Tuscaloosa News and UA News, PhD student Clay Nelson has received a graduate research assistantship from the Office of Archaeological Research (OAR) and the Muscogee (Creek) Nation to look at Creek homeland sites. The goal of the project is to finds links between the archaeological record of the Tennessee Valley and sites in Alabama and Georgia. Nelson will be advised by Dr. Ian Brown... read more ❯
Graduate Students Receive Awards
Published 12/28/2014 in Bama Anthro Blog Network
Author Christopher Lynn
We're very proud of our students, who continue to earn numerous accolades for their efforts in advancing anthropology. In the spring 2014, there were numerous award winners. Paul Eubanks was the winner of the 2014 Bob Work Award for Scholarly Excellence in Archaeology for a paper entitled "The Timing and Distribution of Caddo Salt Production in Northwestern Louisiana." Kareen Hawsey and Paul Eubanks were the 2014-15 co-winners of the David and Elizabeth DeJarnette Endowed Scholarship, which is awarded at the annual spring DeJarnette barbecue at Moundville Archaeological Park. David DeJarnette, a southeast archaeologist, was the first anthropologist at the University of Alabama. The DeJarnette Scholarship is awarded each year to support graduate research about Moundville or Moundville-related topics. Lauren Marsh,... read more ❯
Undergraduate Honors and First Annual Department Poster Competition
Published 12/28/2014 in Bama Anthro Blog Network
Author Christopher Lynn
  At the Spring Undergraduate Honors Day, Katelyn Moss and Meghan Steel were presented awards for their standings as the top Anthropology majors in the 2014 graduating class. Dr. Lisa LeCount presented Steel with the C. Earle Smith Jr. Award and Moss with the Hughes Prize. Trever Chidester placed 3rd for Oral Presentations in the Social Sciences at the 2014 Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity (URCA) conference. URCA presenters from the Department of Anthropology also competed in the first annual Anthropology Undergraduate  Research Poster Competition. Emerging Scholar Hannah Smith (Kathy Oths, faculty mentor) won first prize for "A... read more ❯
Changes in coping throughout adulthood
Published 12/16/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Taylor Burbach
Manfred Diehl, Helena Chui, Elizabeth L. Hay are part of the Adult Development and Aging Project (ADAPT) at Colorado State University. Their mission is "To contribute to the knowledge about healthy and successful adult development and aging through research, education, and collaborative outreach." Dr. Diehl received his PhD in Human Development and Family Studies from Pennsylvania State University and is interested in psychological development throughout the course of adulthood. Diehl, Chui, Hay, and colleagues performed a longitudinal study of the change in coping and defense mechanisms across adulthood. Starting in 1992, they recruited 392 adolescents and adults, the majority of which were of European American descent. 129 of the original sample completed data for all four samples, in 1992, 1994, 1998, and 2004. Participants were asked to two 2-hour testing sessions each time. In order to measure coping and defense mechanisms, the California Psychological... read more ❯
Themes in exercise adherence vs. dropout
Published 12/16/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Taylor Burbach
After reading Greg Downey's The Encultured Brain chapter on neural enculturation in capoeira and Lisa Heywood's 2011 article advocating a cultural neuropychology of sport, I thought a lot about how these articles applied to physical activity in general. What makes people commit to physical activity? This isn't a question I'm unfamiliar with. As a chronic yo-yo dieter and infrequent exerciser (who has the time anyway?), this is something I've asked myself for years, only to find myself lacking motivation again and again despite the colorful articles found online and in pop-culture magazines promising to give me a new outlook on my physical health and help me form lasting fitness-related habits. Lisa Pridgeon and Sarah Grogan provide insight into why adherence to an exercise regimen in difficult for some  by exploring themes shared by people (adherers and non-adherers) who, currently or at one point, held gym memberships. Pridgeon was advised in this project  by Grogan, a professor... read more ❯
Inclusion of Developmental Disabilities in Church
Published 12/9/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author skcharles1
I used this article because it showed that current research proves that children with a developmental disability on the autistic spectrum are helped by their participation in church settings.  It proved helpful by showing what benefits religious involvement could help children with autism.   Article: "Inclusion of people with mental retardation and other developmental disabilities in communities of faith by J. Vogel, E. Polloway, and J. Smith, published in 2006 in Mental Retardation read more ❯

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