Lectures & Workshops

ALLELE speaker Becky Burch interviewed on Capstone Radio.
Dr. Abrams meets Dr. Bindon, who helped develop our Biocultural Medical program and in whose honor the lecture series was started.
Dr. Abrams meets Dr. Jim Bindon, who helped develop our Biocultural Medical program and in whose honor the lecture series was started.

In the fall, we hosted several in-house lectures and workshops and were graced by talks by a few visiting scholars.

On October 8, we were able to take advantage of a visit to Tuscaloosa by Dr. Natilee A. McGruder, Director of the River Region Food Policy Council (RRFPC), who graced us with an Extemporaneous Talk called “The Local Food System: Getting to Know Your Neighbor.” On November 6, we inaugurated our new “Biocultural Anthropology and Health Lecture Series” with a talk by UAB Professor of Philosophy Marshall Abrams entitled “Modeling the Development of Sustainable Rice Production and Religious Practice in Bali.”

Lynn Funkhouser presented on the history, archaeology, and bioarchaeology of the nations first VA hospital, located outside of Pascagoula, MS for the falls first FABBL.
Lynn Funkhouser presented on the history, archaeology, and bioarchaeology of the nations first VA hospital, located outside of Pascagoula, MS for the falls first FABBL.

Several speakers participated in the FABBL (Friday Afternoon Brown Bag Lunch) series, hosted by the Anthropology Club. On September 25, doctoral candidate Lynn Funkhouser presented “The Mexican Soldiers of Greenwood Island, Mississippi.” On October 9, doctoral student Courtney Andrews presented “Finding Culture in Acculturation: Does Cultural Consonance Mediate the Relationship between Acculturative Stress and Health Outcomes among Mexican Immigrants?” On October 23, doctoral candidate Rachel Briggs presented “Public Archaeology in Western North Carolina: Recent Excavations at Spanish Fort San Juan de Joara.” On November 6, doctoral candidate Daniel LaDu presented “Interaction Spheres and ‘Circle-Maps’: Considering the Role that Extra-Regional Exchange Plays in the Process of Culture Change.”

On December 4, Dr. David Meek was kind enough to give a department workshop on spatial ethnographic research design.

The line for Bill Nye tickets, day 1.
The line for Bill Nye tickets, day 1.

Finally, the Department of Anthropology is affiliated with the Alabama Lectures on Life’s Evolution (ALLELE) speaker series, which hosted four lectures in the fall. On September 28, ALLELE co-hosted a talk by science personality Bill Nye the Science Guy called “The Importance of Teaching Evolution.” This was the biggest ALLELE talk to date, with thousands of people turning out for three successive giveaways for roughly 5,000 tickets. Dr. Lynn wrote a summary of the event for the EvoS Consortium (http://evostudies.org/2015/10/how-exactly-is-evolution-a-crosscutting-concept-enter-bill-nye-the-science-guy/). Geologist Linda Ivany (Syracuse University) gave a talk on October 15 called “The Pace of Life—The (Often) Missing Element in Studies of Evolution Using Fossils.” On November 12, historian Ron Numbers (University of Wisconsin-Madison) gave a talk called “Baptizing Dinosaurs: How Once-Suspect Evidence of Evolution Came to Support the Biblical Narrative.” And on December 3, evolutionary psychologist Rebecca Burch (SUNY Oswego) gave a lecture rescheduled from the spring entitled “Semen Chemistry: Implications, Innovations, and Controversy.”

Our students and faculty also gave talks around the University. Dr. Marysia Galbraith gave a talk about her experience in Poznan, Poland for the Fulbright Scholar Program on September 3 entitled “Memory in Fragments: Reassembling Jewish Life in Poland.” On December 4, undergraduate Lauren Pratt presented “Status and Stature in Two Prehistoric Burial Populations” in the Computer-Based Honors Program. (faculty advisors, Drs. Blitz and Jacobi).

Grants & Awards

Department of Anthropology promotional video
3MT winners with Dean Franko, including Sandra Lucia Almeida Zambrano, Anjana Venkatesan, Jordan Rippy, Territa L. Pool, and Courtney Andrews (Source: http://graduate.ua.edu/news/anjana-venkatesan-wins-the-ua-3mt-competition/).
3MT winners with Dean Franko, including Sandra Lucia Almeida Zambrano, Anjana Venkatesan, Jordan Rippy, Territa L. Pool, and Courtney Andrews (Source: http://graduate.ua.edu/news/anjana-venkatesan-wins-the-ua-3mt-competition/).

Several students and faculty received grants, awards, and other honors this past fall. Congratulations to all. You make us very proud!

Students

Doctoral student Courtney Andrews placed fourth in the 3rd annual Three-Minute Thesis (3MT) competition. The Alabama Center for Public Television is working on stories about the finalists and the 3MT that should air in the spring.

The College of Arts & Sciences selected Johnna Dominguez‘s (MA, 2015) thesis entitled “‘Nice Ink, Man’: A Biocultural, Mixed Methods Approach to Tattooing as Costly Honest Signaling among Southern Women” for the 2015 Outstanding Thesis Award and Paul Eubank’s dissertation “Salt Production in the Southeastern Caddo Homeland” for Outstanding Dissertation Research Award. She will be recognized at Honors Day in the spring. Congratulations to Johnna, Paul, and their advisers, Drs. Chris Lynn and Ian Brown, respectively.

The College of Arts & Sciences Undergraduate Creativity and Research Academy (UCRA) awarded $500 to undergraduates Ashley Daugherty, Nick Roy, and Caitlyn Walker (Dr. Chris Lynn, adviser) toward travel expenses to present “Sexual Fluidity Positively Influences Group-Oriented Prosocial Behavior” at the American Association for Physical Anthropology conference in Atlanta, GA this spring.

At the 2015 holiday party, Paul Eubanks was awarded the Panamerican Award for Scholarly Excellence in Archaeology, while Jessica Kowalski was presented with the Richard Krauss Award for Teaching, Research, and Service by a Graduate Student in Anthropology.

Thanks to generous support from the graduate school, a number of our students have received funds for research or conference travel for the fall term. They are: Martina Thomas ($300), Paul Eubanks ($300+$300 supplement as a graduate ambassador), Mirjam Holleman ($300), Clay Nelson ($200), and Rachel Briggs ($200). Each of these students also has received $100 from the Anthropology Department toward presentations at Southeastern Archaeology Conference, American Anthropological Association annual meeting, and elsewhere.

Faculty

Dr. Lesley Jo Weaver received an NSF Senior Award for her work on food insecurity and mental health in Brazil. This is a collaborative 3-site project with her colleagues at Emory and Duke who work in Ethiopia and Haiti, respectively. It consists of two separate grant submissions, one from UA with Jo as the PI, and one from Emory With her colleague as the PI. The grant supports 3 phases of research scheduled to span 3 years in each site.

Congratulations to Dr. Jason DeCaro (and Psychology collaborator Dr. Ansley Gilpin) on the receiving of a major grant from the Imagination Institute. Imagination Institute “grants are aimed at the development of better ways of assessing and promoting imagination and creativity,” according to the Penn News press release. Drs. DeCaro and Gilpin “will receive $199,940 to advance the measurement and improvement of fantasy orientation and imaginative play in children. They aim to answer two important questions to propel research in childhood imagination: How is children’s imagination best defined and measured? and can imagination be stimulated to enhance children’s development?”

Dr. David Meek is the recipient of a $1,000 travel award. By virtue of this award, The Academic Conference and Presentation Committee recognizes his participation in The 6th International Conference of the Network of School Gardens, which “will support the dissemination of community engagement research and scholarship and provide relevant training opportunities.”

 

 

Spring Guest Lectures

Chris Lynn, Jeff Lozier, Wendi Schnauffer, Lynn Funkhouser, Pat McGovern, Cassie Medeiros
Chris Lynn, Jeff Lozier, Wendi Schnauffer, Lynn Funkhouser, Pat McGovern, Cassie Medeiros dining before ALLELE talk.

The Department of Anthropology is one of the regular sponsors of the Alabama Lectures on Life’s Evolution, organized by the University’s Evolution Working Group (EVOWOG). This past academic year, EVOWOG hosted lectures by paleontologist Anthony Martin, journalist Chris Mooney, archaeologist Patrick McGovern, and biologists Michael Antolin and Sean Carroll. Although they were all special events, the Anthropology Department’s contribution this year was Patrick McGovern. “Dr. Pat” has been called “the Indiana Jones of beer archaeology” for his work in deciphering the codes of ancient beverages to understand humanity’s long history with intoxication and domestication. Several years ago, Dr. Pat teamed up with Dogfish Head Brewery in Delaware, which won a contest among several craft breweries, to recreate the ancient ales for which McGovern has identified the recipes. Dr. McGovern gave a talk for the ALLELE series on January 29 and, while here, was kind enough to meet with our students and attend an Ancient Ales tasting, organized by the Evolutionary Studies Club and at one of our local craft breweries, Druid City.

In addition to Dr. Pat and the Master’s Colloquia presentations discussed in a previous article, the Anthro Club also brought guest lectures our way by hosting four FABBLs (Friday Anthropology Brown Bag Lunch lectures) during the spring.

February 20, doctoral student Sarah Morrow presented “PowerPATHS in West Central Alabama: Updates on Program, Process, and Pedagogy.”

March 6, doctoral candidate Mitch Childress presented “Cox Mound Gorgets: Distributions, Chronology, and Style.”

March 27, doctoral candidate Rachel Briggs presented “An Introduction to Residue Analysis and the Mississippian Standard Jar.”

April 10, doctoral candidate Jessica Kowalski presented “Results from the Alabama Anthropology Club Surface Collection at the Arcola Mounds.”

Student and Faculty Awards

Jason DeCaro with co-recipients of an Award for Outstanding Faculty/Staff-Initiated Engagement Effort, John Lochman, Ansley Gilpin, and Qshequilla Mitchell.

Numerous students and faculty were recognized for achievements and commitment this spring. Several undergraduates mentored by Anthropology faculty were recognized at the annual Undergraduate Research and Creativity Conference as follows: Mark Ortiz, Honorable Mention for Oral Presentations in the Fine Arts and Humanities division (David Meek, faculty mentor); Taylor Lawhon, 4th Place for Oral Presentations in the Social Sciences division (Ian Brown, faculty mentor); Rachel Madey, 1st Place for in Emerging Scholars Fine Arts and Humanities Division and International Focus (Kathy Oths, faculty mentor), and Sommer Hallquist and Madeline Anscombe, 2nd Place in Emerging Scholars Fine Arts and Humanities division (Ian Brown, faculty mentor).

Lynn Funkhouser accepts her award from Ian Brown.
Lynn Funkhouser accepts her award from Ian Brown.
Jessica Kowalski accepts a DeJarnette Scholarship.
Jessica Kowalski accepts a DeJarnette Scholarship.
Greg Batchelder accepts the 2015 Maxwell Scholarship from Dr. Brown.
Greg Batchelder accepts the 2015 Maxwell Scholarship from Dr. Brown.

This year’s recipients of David and Elizabeth DeJarnette Endowed Scholarships in Anthropology are doctoral candidates Lynn Funkhouser and Jessica Kowalski. Doctoral student Greg Batchelder received the Allen R. Maxwell Endowed Anthropology Scholarship. The competitions were extremely tough, as always, so these honors are indeed great. For this year, each awardees will be receiving scholarships of $8,000 each to be used toward their research.

Achsah Dorsey, who received her M.A. in Anthropology in 2014, received the University of Alabama Outstanding Research by a Master’s Student Award for her thesis “Food Insecurity, Maternal Mental Health, and Child Well-Being in NW Tanzania.” This follows receipt of the same award in the Arts & Sciences in the fall 2014.

Katelyn Moss receives undergraduate honor from Dean Olin.
Katelyn Moss receives undergraduate honor from Dean Olin.
Taylor Lawhon, Jessi Mays, and Melinda Carr receive undergraduate honors from Cameron Lacquement.
Taylor Lawhon, Jessi Mays, and Melinda Carr receive undergraduate honors from Cameron Lacquement.

This year’s Honors Day allowed three of our outstanding undergraduates to be recognized. Katelyn Moss received a Dean’s Award of Merit, while Taylor Lawhon, Jessi Mays, and Melinda Carr were acknowledged as recipients of the “Smitty” and Hughes Awards. Taylor received the C. Earl Smith Award, which is given to the graduating senior with the highest GPA in Anthropology. Jessi and Melinda were co-recipients of the Lynn Hughes Award, which is given to students in Anthropology or Economics who capture the imagination of the faculty through potential, intransigence, inventiveness, perseverance, or a combination of qualities.

The following students received funding from the Graduate School for their proposals to the Graduate Student Research and Travel Fund: Mirjam HollemanLynn FunkhouserLessye DeMossDaniel LaDuRachel BriggsLisaMarie Malischke, and Paul Eubanks.

The Research Advisory Committee (RAC) selected Jason DeCaro as the 2015 recipient of the President’s Faculty Research Award for Arts & Sciences—Social Sciences. These awards, organized by the RAC and sponsored by our President and by the Vice President for Research and Economic Development, recognize select University of Alabama faculty members whose research or scholarship represents excellence in their field.

Chris Lynn receiving AS Outstanding Commitment to Teaching Award from Dean Olin.
Chris Lynn receiving AS Outstanding Commitment to Teaching Award from Dean Olin.
Jason DeCaro with co-recipients of an Award for Outstanding Faculty/Staff-Initiated Engagement Effort, John Lochman, Ansley Gilpin, and Qshequilla Mitchell.
Jason DeCaro with co-recipients of an Award for Outstanding Faculty/Staff-Initiated Engagement Effort, John Lochman, Ansley Gilpin, and Qshequilla Mitchell.

Dr. DeCaro and his collaborators Ansley Gilpin, Caroline Boxmeyer, and John Lochman were also recipients of the 2015 Center for Community-Based Partnerships Awards for Outstanding Faculty/Staff-Initiated Engagement Effort. In addition, David Meek and Sarah Morrow were recognized at the same event with a Community Engagement Fellowship Award.

Dr. Lisa LeCount was awarded a National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration grant for $21,412 and a College Academy for Research, Scholarship and Creativity Activity grant ($5,000). These grants were to support another season of the Actuncan Project—“Archaeological Research at Actuncan’s E-Group: Testing the Political Significance of Preclassic Lowland Maya Public Architecture.” E-groups are the earliest known public architecture on ancient Maya sites.  Multiple models have been proposed to explain their significance, the most recent of which suggests that Middle Preclassic (1000 to 400 B.C.) E-groups served as high-points on the geopolitical landscape to claim territory visible from them.  The proposed research seeks to test this model by excavating Actuncan’s E-group to discover the heights of early architectural stages and performing ArcGIS geospatial analyses (least-cost path and radial line-of-sight) to determine the territorial boundaries visible or walkable from contemporaneous E-groups within the upper Belize River valley.

Finally, Chris Lynn received the Outstanding Commitment to Teaching Award at the Undergraduate Honor’s Day celebration. This highly coveted award is issued each year by the Leadership Board of the College of Arts and Sciences and recognizes a single faculty member for his or her superior teaching ability and absolute dedication to students. This is a most deserving award for Dr. Lynn and a great honor for our Department.

Thanks to Our Generous Supporters

A total of $32,134 was donated to the Department of Anthropology from 19 different organizations or private individuals in 2013-14. We received one donation since the last newsletter from Roberta S. Largin. We are grateful for the support. These gifts helped support faculty research ($21,000), graduate student research ($8900), or student scholarship ($2234) during this past year. In-kind donations were also made to provide books for the Anthropology Reading Room Library and benches for the ground floor in ten Hoor.

The Department distributed $12,200 in student awards and scholarships during the academic year. The majority of these funds went to two graduate student recipients of the DeJarnette Scholarship (Clay Nelson and Rachel Briggs, $5,000 each), but a number of undergraduates also benefited from scholarship aid as well (Maryanne Mobley and Meghan Steel, and Katie Moss—$500 each). The Alan Maxwell Scholarship is now an endowed fund, awarded this year to Max Stein, and will be reported upon in next year’s annual report.

We welcome contributions and have several funds to which donations can be made, including the DeJarnette, Maxwell, Smith, and Krause awards, the Anthropology Club, and the Archaeology Field School at Moundville. Please contact Teri Kirkendoll (tkirkendoll@ua.edu) for more information or to make a contribution.

Fall 2014 Conferences and Presentations

Professor Emeritus Jim Knight with presenters honoring his retirement in session" From Mound Ritual to Iconography to Spanish Conquistadors: Papers in Honor of Vernon James Knight, Jr." at the 71st Annual Southeastern Archaeology Conference, Greenville, South Carolina.
Professor Emeritus Jim Knight with presenters honoring his retirement in session" From Mound Ritual to Iconography to Spanish Conquistadors: Papers in Honor of Vernon  James Knight, Jr." at the 71st Annual Southeastern Archaeology Conference, Greenville, South Carolina.
Professor Emeritus Jim Knight with presenters honoring his retirement in session” From Mound Ritual to Iconography to Spanish Conquistadors: Papers in Honor of Vernon James Knight, Jr.” at the 71st Annual Southeastern Archaeology Conference, Greenville, South Carolina.

Briggs, Rachel V.
The Hominy Foodway in the Historic Native Eastern Woodlands. Presented at the 71st Annual Southeastern Archaeology Conference, Greenville, South Carolina, November 12-15.

Dressler, William W.
Cultural consonance as a mediator of health disparities. Abstracts of the 113th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Washington, DC, December 3-7.

Galbraith, Marysia H.
Przeszłość, teraźniejszość i pryszłość: zmienne orientacje czasowe w Polsce od 1989 (Past, Present, and Future: Changing Temporal Orientations in Poland since 1989), University of Rzeszów,Rzeszów, Poland, November 4.

Galbraith, Marysia H.
Being and Becoming European in Poland: European Integration and Self-Identity, at the conference Political Culture: European Norms and Polish Reality, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland, December 17.

Herndon, Kelsey E., B.A. Houk, and D.S. Sandrock
The 2014 Excavations at Chan Chich, Belize. Presented at the 2014 Belize Anthropology and Archaeology Symposium; San Ignacio, Belize, July 4.

Knight, Vernon James
The Archaeology of Moundville’s Sociogram. Invited lecture for the Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. September 29.

Lynn, Christopher D., Virgil Roy Beasley, III, Kelsey E. Herndon, H. Francois Dengah, II, A. Brooke Persons
Anthropology is Elementary and can be Taught There: Teaching Four-Field Anthropology to 3rd and 4th Grade Students. Talk at presented at the 113th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC, December 3­-7.

Lynn, Christopher D., and Baba Brinkman
“Rap Guide to Evolution” Influences on Knowledge, Attitudes, and Emotions. Talk at the Association for Politics and the Life Sciences Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA, October 17-18.

Meek, David
Producing Places: Politics of Mapping Technologies and Cartographic Production. American Anthropological Association annual conference. Washington, D.C., December 3rd-7th.

Nelson, Ted Clay
Mortuary Practices, Social Status, and Wealth at the Rhodes Site in Moundville, Alabama. Paper presented at the 71st annual meeting of the Southeastern Archaeological Conference, Greenville, SC, November 13.

Oths, Kathryn
Global Health Policy toward Traditional Healers: A 21st Century Update (poster).  American Anthropological Association, Abstracts of the 113th Annual Meetings, Washington, DC, Dec. 3-7.

Regnier, Amanda, Erin Phillips, and Rachel V. Briggs
From Mound Ritual to Iconography to Spanish Conquistadors: Papers in Honor of Vernon  James Knight, Jr. 71st Annual Southeastern Archaeology Conference, Greenville, South Carolina, November 12-15.

Simova, Borislava, David W. Mixter, and Lisa J. LeCount
The Social Lives of Structures: Veneration Rituals and Changing Cultural Landscapes at Actuncan, Belize. A paper presented at the 12th annual Belize Archaeology symposium, San Ignacio, Belize, July 2.

Weaver, Lesley Jo
“My mind is a little different”: Suffering and Resilience among Women with Type 2 Diabetes in North India. American Anthropological Association annual conference, Washington, DC, December 3-7.

Meek and Students Receive Grants and Awards

Dr. David Meek and students in his "Anthropology of Food" course enjoy the pleasant weather outside recently.
Dr. DeCaro presents Krause Award to Paul Eubanks (Photo: C.Lynn).
Dr. DeCaro presents Krause Award to Paul Eubanks (Photo: C.Lynn).

Dr. David Meek was awarded a $700 SECU Faculty travel grant from the Office of Academic Affairs to travel to the University of Mississippi and collaborate with scholars at the Southern Foodways Alliance.

At the annual Department Holiday party on December 18, doctoral students Rachel Briggs and Paul Eubanks were presented with the Panamerican and Richard A. Krause Prizes, respectively. Professor Emeritus Richard Krause is an archaeologist and cultural anthropologist who served the Department of Anthropology at UA for 31 years during a crucial period of development. Because of his commitment to graduate student training, the Krause Prize was established to recognize students who display academic excellence at the graduate level based on the promise of the student’s proposed thesis or dissertation. The Panamerican Award for Scholarly Excellence in Archaeology

Paul Eubanks was also a finalist in the “Three-Minute Thesis” that was sponsored by the UA Graduate School in November.

Achsah Dorsey (MA 2014) received the College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Research by a Masters Student award for her biocultural work in Tanzania on maternal and child health. She is now a finalist for the University-wide honor. Achsah recently began PhD studies at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Dr. Blitz presents Panamerican Award to Rachel Briggs Photo: C.Lynn).
Dr. Blitz presents Panamerican Award to Rachel Briggs Photo: C.Lynn).

An outstanding group of Graduate School Research and Travel Award applications were received in the fall. The Anthropology Department can only nominate a limited number because of a requirement to provide matching funds. Nine applications were received, and five were nominated. The graduate school awarded funding as follows:

  • Erik Porth, $300 from the graduate school, $100 from the department
  • Lynn Funkhouser, $300 from the graduate school, $100 from the department
  • Jessica Kowalski, $300 from the graduate school, $100 from the department
  • Greg Batchelder, $100 from the graduate school, $100 from the department
  • Ashley Stewart, $100 from the graduate school, $100 from the department

Greg Batchelder was also the recipient of a $200 Research and Travel Grant from the UA College of Arts and Sciences toward traveling to Washington, DC to present ?? at the American Anthropological Association annual meeting.

Spring 2014 Conferences and Presentations by UA Anthropologists

Undergraduates Sophia Fazal and Lauren Pratt with Dr. Chris Lynn at NEEPS 2014 conference in New Paltz, NY. Photo by C. Lynn.

Blitz, John
Skeuomorphs and the Construction of Object Value in the Ancient Eastern Woodlands. Paper presented at the 79th Annual Meeting, Society for American Archaeology, Austin, TX, April 23-27.

Drs. Juan Carlos González Faraco & Michael Murphy conducting fieldwork in Spain, 2014.
Drs. Juan Carlos González Faraco & Michael Murphy conducting fieldwork in Spain.

Briggs, Rachel V.
Evidence for Nixtamalizaton in the Southeastern United States. Poster presented at the 79th Annual Society for American Archaeology Conference, Austin, TX, April 23-27.

Briggs, Rachel V.
The Ethnohistory of Nixtamalization in the Southeastern United States. Paper presented at the 37th Annual Society for Ethnobiology Conference, Cherokee, NC, May 11-14.

Brinkman, Baba and Christopher Lynn
Quantifying Impacts of Peer-Reviewed Rap. Eighth Annual Conference of the NorthEastern Evolutionary Psychology Society, New Paltz, NY, April 10-13.

Brown, Richard A., II, and William W. Dressler
Cultural consonance and the course of diabetes. Abstracts of the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology, March 19-23, Albuquerque, NM.

Dressler, William W.
Who’s culturally consonant, and why? Abstracts of the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology, March 19-23, Albuquerque, NM.

Dressler, William W.
Cultural Consonance: Linking the Cultural, the Individual, and the Biological. Invited lecture for the Department of Anthropology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, Jan. 31.

Dressler, William W.
Culture: Consensus, Contention, Distribution, and Consonance. Invited lecture for the Department of Global Environmental Health Sciences, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA, March 14.

Eubanks, Paul
A Reconstruction of the Caddo Salt Making Process at Drake’s Salt Works. Paper Presented at the 55th Annual Meeting of the Caddo Conference, Tyler Texas.

Herndon, Kelsey E., BA Houk, M Willis, and CP Walker.
The Structure from Motion Solution: Mapping Structure A-5 at Chan Chich, Belize. Presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology; Austin, Texas.

Kosiba, Steve
“The Cultural Landscape of Cusco before the Inkas” and “Wari Influence on Inka State Development.” Invited Lectures. Papers presented at the special symposium “The Inkas and their Origins,” Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany.

Kosiba, Steve
“By this Standard: The Materiality of Social Difference in the Inka Heartland.” Paper presented at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Austin, TX.

Kosiba, Steve
“Feeding Time: Human-Animal Sacrifices and the Making of Ontological Boundaries in the Inka Empire.” Invited Lecture. Paper presented at the special symposium “Animal Magnetism: The Push and Pull of Consocial Life,” Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University, Providence, RI.

Kosiba, Steve
“Assembling an Inka Landscape: The Construction of Land and Subjects at Inka Imperial Ollantaytambo (Cusco, Peru).” Invited Lecture. Paper presented at the Linden Museum, Stuttgart, Germany.

Kosiba, Steve
“Cultivating a Sacred Environment: Politics, Ecology, and the Production of Landscape in the Early Inka Empire.” Invited Lecture. Paper presented to the Department of Anthropology and Geography, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA.

Kosiba, Steve
“La percepción del espacio en el mundo andino.” Invited Lecture. Paper presented at the special conference of the Programa de Estudios Andinos, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Peru. Pisac, Peru.

Kosiba, Steve
“The Nature of the Inka City: Labor Coordination and Road Networks in Imperial Ollantaytambo and Cusco.” Invited Lecture. Paper presented at the special symposium “Nuevas Tendencias en el estudio del Camino Inka,” Proyecto Qhapaq Ñan and Ministerio de Cultura. Lima, Peru.

Lawhon, Taylor, Karl Bennett, and Paul Eubanks
Preliminary Interpretations from Two Potential Habitation Zones at Drake’s Salt Works. Paper Presented at the 71st Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Archaeological Conference, Greenville, S.C.

Undergraduates Sophia Fazal and Lauren Pratt at NorthEastern Evolutionary Psychology Society conference in New Paltz, NY in April.
Undergraduates Sophia Fazal and Lauren Pratt (center) at NorthEastern Evolutionary Psychology Society conference in New Paltz, NY in April.

Lynn, Christopher
Hard-to-Fake Signaling of Religious Commitment Reduces Biological Stress where Just Trying to Manage Impressions Does Not. Eighth Annual Conference of the NorthEastern Evolutionary Psychology Society, New Paltz, NY, April 10-13.

Murphy, Michael Dean
Diversidad y contrastes en la cultura universitaria norteamericana (Diversity and Contrastes in American University Culture” presented at  the Universidad de Huelva (Spain). February 14.

Murphy, Michael Dean
Lo público y lo privado en la cultura universitaria norteamericana: el caso de la Universidad de Alabama (The Public and the Private in American University Culture: the Case of the University of Alabama) presented at the Universidad de Granada (Spain). February 25.

Oths, Kathryn S., Adam Booher, Rodrigo Lazo, and Max Stein
Biomedicine Meets a Highland Bonesetter: A Workshop Inspired by Systematic Discovery. Society for Applied Anthropology, Albuquerque, NM, Mar. 18-22.

Pratt, Lauren V. and Christopher Lynn
Human Evolution at the Hearth: The Influence of Fire on Relaxation and Psychophysiology. Eighth Annual Conference of the NorthEastern Evolutionary Psychology Society, New Paltz, NY, April 10-13.

Stein, Max J.
Culture, Social Networks and Health among Andean Migrants in Northern Peru.  Paper presented to Department of Anthropology, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS.

Wells, E. Christian, Lisa J. LeCount, Thomas R. Jamison, Kara A. Rothenberg, and David W. Mixter
Ancient Maya Urban Soilscapes as Geochemical Reservoirs: Characterization of Lime-plaster Surfaces from the Palace Complex at Actuncan, Belize. A paper presented at the Association of American Geographers in the Special Session Geoarchaeology: Soils, Sediments, Cultural Stone, and Paleoenvironments, organized by Timothy Beach, Tampa, Florida, April 8-12.

 

Students Earning Fall 2013 Awards

Undergraduate Meghan Steel

Graduate Student Awards

Doctoral student Paul Eubanks received a National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant for his project “Caddo Salt Production in Northwestern Louisiana.” Congratulations to Paul and his adviser, Dr. Ian Brown. Paul is our seventh doctoral student to receive an NSF DDIG. This speaks, first and foremost, to Paul’s great promise as a scholar and also to the strength of our young doctoral program.

Doctoral student Erik Porth was received the Richard A. Krause Award at the 2013 Holiday luncheon. The Krause Award, established in 2008, is given in recognition of outstanding scholarship by a graduate student in Anthropology. Porth, whose research focus is the historical process of placemaking at Moundville, has consistently exemplified this in his dedication to research, teaching, and service to our department.

Master’s student Kelsey Herndon was honored with a Graduate Student Association award to support travel to the South-Central Conference on Mesoamerica to present “Structure from Motion Mapping and Remote Sensing at the Maya Site of Chan Chich, Belize.”

Undergraduate Meghan Steel
Undergraduate Meghan Steel

The Graduate School and Anthropology Department provide awards several times a year for meritorious research projects and for travel to present research at conferences.  A total of seven proposals were submitted to the Anthropology Graduate Committee for the Fall 2013 round, all of which were subsequently forwarded to the Graduate School for consideration and received awards. The following students (in alphabetical order) received awards in the fall 2013: Jolynn Amrine Goertz, to support travel to the American Anthropological Association (AAA) to present “Fragments and Field Notebooks: Franz Boas and the Chehalis Oral Tradition”; Paul Eubanks, to support travel to the Southeastern Archaeological Conference (SEAC) to present “The Timing and Distribution of Caddo Salt Production in Northwestern Louisiana”; Lynn Funkhouser, to support travel to SEAC to present “An Analysis of Near-Mound Cemeteries at Moundville”; Jessica Kowalski, to support travel to SEAC to present “Mississippian Period Settlement Size and Soil Productivity in the Southern Yazoo Basin, Mississippi”; LisaMarie Malischke, to support travel to the Annual Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology to present “The Heterogeneity of Early French Forts and Settlements. A Comparison to Fort St. Pierre (1719-1729) in French Colonial Louisiane”; Ross Owens, to support thesis research on “How Smart Phones Affect Skin Conductance and Social Support Systems Among Students at the University of Alabama”; and Max Stein, to support travel to AAA to present “Religion as Resilience: Evaluating the Intersections of Religious Collectivity and Disease in Limon Province, Costa Rica.”

Undergraduate Awards

This year, the C. Earle Smith Award for the most outstanding senior goes to two students–Maryanne Mobley and Meghan Steel. The Hughes Prize for a student who shows great potential and perseverance goes to Katie Moss. They do our department proud with their excellent grades, drive and determination, and wonderful personalities.