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Duana Fullwiley is a medical anthropologist who graduated in 2002 from UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco with her Ph.D. Fullwiley has conducted a multi-sited field research in the United States about the emergent technologies that measure human genetic diversity among populations and between individuals. Her main interest is how scientists promote genetic citizenship. This was Dr. Fullwiley’s second book project and explains exactly how U.S. political concepts of diversity, usually glossed as “race,” function in genetic recruitment protocols and study designs for research on complex diseases, “tailored medicine,” ancestry tracing, and personal genomics.

Dr. Fullwiley’s first book is The Encultured Gene: Sickle Cell Health Politics and Biologicalss Difference in West Africa. This book was written in 2011, and received the 2014 Robert B. Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology from the American Anthropological Association, and the 2011 Amaury Talbot Prize for African Anthropology from the Royal Anthropological Institute. This book used data gathered from ethnographic fieldwork in Senegal, France, and the United States. She uses her fieldwork data and weaves together postcolonial genetic science, the effects of structural adjustment on health resources, and patient activism between Senegal and France to show how African sickle cell has been ordered in ethnic-national terms at the level of the gene.

She used to be a professor at Harvard and is now an associate professor at Stanford University teaching courses in medical anthropology and anthropology of science. She is currently in the research stages for her second book Tabula Raza: Mapping Race and Human Diversity in American Genome Science.

https://web.stanford.edu/dept/anthropology/cgi-bin/web/?q=node/1079

http://press.princeton.edu/titles/9613.html