Classifications
Specialty

William Dressler, Professor

24-B ten Hoor Hall | (205) 348-1954 | wdressle@as.ua.edu

http://bdressler.people.ua.edu/

  • Biocultural medical anthropology
  • Culture and disease risk
  • Culture and the individual
  • Cultural consonance

Marysia Galbraith, Professor

17 ten Hoor Hall | (205) 348-8412 | mgalbrai@ua.edu

http://mgalbraith.people.ua.edu

  • National and ethnic identity
  • East and Central Europe
  • Globalization

Stephanie McClure, Assistant Professor

smcclur1@ua.edu

My overarching area of interest is culture, the body, and health. Said in another way, my primary research interest (currently) is the body as the subject andobject of culture, and the bearing that subject/object duality has on how health is understood, experienced, assessed, etc.

My current pursuits with respect to that overarching interest fall into three categories:

  • physicality and identity
  • intersectionality
  • physical activity and wellbeing

My current projects  and their category alignment:

  • Utility of  robust norms assessment for increasing the predictive capacity of health behavior theories (physicality and wellbeing)
  • Effect of the psychosocial benefits of physical activity on girls’ school performance (physicality and wellbeing)
  • Collage construction as a method for exploring physicality and identity (physicality and identity)
  • The role of race/gender as a key intersection in African American adolescent girls’ physicality (intersectionality)
  • History as a social determinant of health (this really goes back to my overarching question).

My population focus is African American women and girls.

Michael D. Murphy, Professor Emeritus

24C ten Hoor Hall | 205-348-1953 | mdmurphy@ua.edu

http://mdmurphy.people.ua.edu/

Since 1984 Dr. Murphy has been studying Andalusian Marianism with a field research focus on the pilgrimage to La Virgen del Rocio, a statue of the Virgin Mary whose shrine is located in the marshlands of the Guadalquivir River. Much of this work has been done in collaboration with Dr. Juan Carlos González Faraco of the Universidad de Huelva. The two have also investigated the round up and drive of horses from the marshes of Doñana National Park to the Andalusian town of Almonte. In addition to its continuing importance as a venerable local cultural practice, the annual round-up of marsh mares constitutes the last remnant of the Spanish equestrian and livestock cultural complex that directly inspired the free-range ranching traditions of the gaucho, the vaquero, and the cowboy of the Western Hemisphere.

Kathryn Oths, Professor

24-d ten Hoor Hall | (205) 348-1957 | koths@as.ua.edu

http://koths.people.ua.edu/

  • Biocultural medical anthropology
  • Treatment choice
  • Healers
  • Health outcomes
  • Latin America

Margaret Searcy, Emeritus Faculty