Clara Alexander

Clara Alexander

cealexander2@crimson.ua.edu

I am a PhD student in the field of Mesoamerican archaeology. My fascination with the prehispanic peoples of Mesoamerican began in 2019 during a trip to central Mexico, which inspired me to devote the rest of my undergraduate career to anthropology. Two years later I graduated with a BA from Brandeis University and then participated in my first archaeological field season, which was focused on the 3D documentation of an ancient Maya hieroglyphic stairway. Here at UA, with the guidance of Dr. Alexandre Tokovinine, I want to expand my knowledge of ancient Mesoamerica, and particularly the Maya. Within this broad field of study, I am eager to identify the specific questions and methodologies that will eventually shape my dissertation.

Pronouns: she/her/hers

Cheyenne Davis

Cheyenne Davis

cedavis18@crimson.ua.edu

Cheyenne Davis is a M.A. student focusing in Mesoamerican archaeology under Dr. Alexandre Tokovinine. She completed her undergraduate studies in 2019 at Troy University where she received a Bachelor of Science in History and Anthropology. While at Troy, Cheyenne completed field work at the Vada Volaterrana site in Italy and participated in a cultural exchange at the Gansu Agricultural Institute in Lanzhou, China. Her research interests include complex civilizations in Mesoamerica, mythology, witchcraft, and the function of religious ceremonies.

Photo of Mike Fedoroff

Mike Fedoroff

mpfedoroff@crimson.ua.edu

I am an archaeology PhD student with research interests in the field of Southeastern Archaeology particularly within the Pine Hills region.  My research emphasis relates to landscape archaeology, traditional cultural knowledge, Indigenous archaeology, and indigenous collaboration as it applies to material culture, experimental archaeology, historic preservation, and cultural keystone species.  I received a Baccalaureate of Arts and Letters (Cum Laude) in Anthropology with a minor in English from the University of Southern Mississippi in 2006.  My Masters of Arts in Anthropology with a minor in Sociology from the University of Southern Mississippi was completed in 2009.  I have spent the last decade in the field working with indigenous groups conducting archaeological fieldwork and working with various Tribal Nations to identify the role and application of archaeology in cultural revitalization efforts across the United States.

Steven Filoromo

Steven Filoromo

sfiloromo@crimson.ua.edu

Steve Filoromo is a graduate student studying archaeology at the University of Alabama. He is specifically interested in the intersections of community, identity, and place-making using archaeological geophysics and compositional analyses, as seen through a variety of archaeological and environmental materials. His current work focuses on the Moundville III (1400-1520) and Moundville IV (1520-1690) periods in the Black Warrior River Valley.

Lilly Honea

lnhonea@crimson.ua.edu

My name is Lilly Honea. I am a master’s student interested in southeastern archaeology, museology, and historic preservation. I am especially interested in early European colonial efforts in eastern North America and the Revolutionary War within the southeast.

Marinda Lawley

Marinda Lawley

mjlawley@crimson.ua.edu

Marinda is a M.A. student and teaching assistant under Dr. Tokovinine. Her focus is Mesoamerican/Mayan archaeology. She completed her undergraduate studies and earned her Bachelor’s of Science in Anthropology at Troy University. After graduation, Marinda spent time working at the Alabama Department of Archives and History, specifically with their extensive NAGPRA Native American collection. Her research interests include Native American studies post-contact, religions and witchcraft, and mythology.”

Juan Monzon

Juan Monzon

jfmonzon@crimson.ua.edu

http://archaeobotany.ua.edu/juan-monzon.html

I graduated from the University of Alabama in 2020 with B.A. in Anthropology and a minor in Psychology. My experiences with fieldwork at the PIAPAN and San Jose de Moro projects on the North Coast of Peru have continued to drive my interest in Andean archaeology, as has my work in the Ancient People and Plants Lab under Dr. Katherine Chiou.

Throughout my M.A. I will be collaborating with Jenna Hurtubise at the PIAPAN project, focusing on feasting patterns and periods of transition at the site by excavating atop an adobe-stepped platform situated at the peak of a small mountain.

Photo of Caleb Ranum

Caleb Ranum

cranum@crimson.ua.edu

I graduated with BAs in Anthropology and Biology from Pacific Lutheran University in 2017 and spent the next two years as an English teacher in Rimavska Sobota, Slovakia. I am a masters student focusing on paleoethnobotany. My thesis research looks at changes in subsistence patterns following conquest events. I will conduct my research in the north coast of Peru, specifically the Casma valley, to examine how ancient food pathways changed following the Chimú conquest of the region. I am also assisting with research in the Ancient People and Plants Laboratory cataloging Capsicum seeds.

Benny Robinson

jbrobinson5@crimson.ua.edu

I am a M.A. student interested in archaeology, with a particular interest in paleoethnobotany. I am specifically intrigued in learning about food ways of native peoples in the past, and how those food ways may relate to social structure. It is my hope that some of these food ways discovered in the past can be applicable today, as certain crops used by native peoples in the southeast may be able to provide food for us today. With agriculture relying so heavily on only a few dozen species of crops it is important that all avenues for potential nutrition are explored.

Julia Sponholtz

Julia Sponholtz

jgsponholtz@crimson.ua.edu

I am a master’s student studying paleoethnobotany under Dr. Katherine Chiou. I graduated with a BA in Anthropology and Spanish and a BS in Biology from the University of Alabama in 2020. During undergrad, I focused on bioarchaeology, researching the measurement data from the UA osteology collections and taking part in field schools in Ireland and Georgia. I have also participated in the Human Behavioral Ecology Research Group (HBERG) since 2017, and I have worked in a biology lab studying fish eggs. I am interested in researching health and diet in past peoples.