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Final Day at Arcadia Spring 2017 - Food! A Team Teaching Effort
So for our last day at TMSE we talked about food and how it is a thing that gathers everyone together in all cultures. But, first we started off with a short quiz about everything we covered in the past weeks at TMSE to determine what information was being absorbed and remembered. Each of our little clans had some very good scores on the quiz and the top three individuals who scored the highest were rewarded with gummy worms and gummy bears. Next, we went into the PowerPoint lecture which discussed foods from different areas around the globe as well as how these foods related to the culture they came from. One of our examples was the Margherita pizza, named after Queen Margherita, and we discussed how she liked it because it reminded her of the Italian flag. We also talked about how, in Indonesia, a... read more ❯

Escuela Shuabb
Published 4/2/2017 in The Schema Author Greg Batchelder
“Good morning” “GOOD MORNING!” “What is your name?” “My name is BELLA!” “Your name is Bella. And where do you live Bella?” “I live in SHUABB!” “I love you Bella.” Bella is six years old. She is one of 15 students, ranging from six years of age to 13, who attend Shuabb elementary. I am a gringo. I am working on my doctorate in anthropology from the University of Alabama. I work at the elementary school every weekday. The students here take classes in their native Bribri language and culture. They also have classes in traditional subjects such as math, science, geography, history, and Spanish. I teach English, supervise an ethnography project in which the older students are creating video blogs, and offer workshops in other subjects ranging from ethnobotany to cosmology. The community of Shuabb lies within the poorest district in the country of Costa Rica. The school receives minimal... read more ❯

AiE in Madagascar IV: Centre ValBio & Night Walking with Mouse Lemurs
See previous post I, II, and III in this series, or related posts to this month-long trip here and here. Note in our previous episode that I wasn't sure if I had meetings set up, with who, or about what when I arrived at Ranomafana. I received a message from Dustin that I had a 10AM appointment, but he had not been able to confirm, so I should just ask for Maya Moore or Pascal Rabeson. When I arrived at Centre ValBio (CVB), Maya had left for Tana and Pascal was in another village until later in the day. Nevertheless, I was able to get an appointment for later in the day with him. In the meantime, I explored the village, taking photos. I came across one of the silk making coops. I couldn't afford to buy a scarf but was given permission to take photos. However, I overstayed my welcome, taking so many... read more ❯

AiE in Madagascar III: Road to Ranomafana
See previous post 1 and post 2 in this series, or related posts to this month-long trip here and here. The drive to Ranomafana is about 12 hours. After experiencing the Tana roads, I thought maybe it was close via bad roads, but it's really 12 hours in a 4WD at relatively high speed but through winding roads. For 12 hours, I was tossed side to side, tires screeching on the road. I was very passive in this adventure, which is ironic when I think that this project arose because the TMSE PTA asked me to offer an anthropology course several years ago when my kids were in 3rd grade. I didn't want to do it because I didn't have the time to take on any more service, but I wanted to do it because I wanted to be able to share what I do with my kids and help their school.... read more ❯

AiE in Madagascar II: Studying & Teaching Abroad Opportunities in Madagascar
The first post of this series is at http://evostudies.org/2017/03/fleeced-at-the-palace-of-the-mad-queen-other-poignantly-colonial-experiences-in-madagascar/. I’ve been jet lagged from the 8-hour time difference and keep waking up at 2:30 AM, unable to go to sleep. After a day or two, I remembered I have Starbucks instant coffees in my bag. I got some hot water from the sink and hazarded a coffee in the middle of the night to get me going enough to get some work done. Later I checked and learned that the water has some dirt in it, but, according to Jurgen, the owner of Villa V where I am staying, the German Embassy actually had it tested, hoping it would be found undrinkable and merit them getting raises for working in an undesirable location. It’s got some silt in it but is fine otherwise. No raises for them, no dysentery for me. It says 37 minutes but generally took over... read more ❯

Race at TMSE - What is race anyway? - A Team Teaching Effort.
Today at TMSE we discussed race and human variation. The lecture covered the intricacies of how we perceive race in America by addressing what anthropologists view it as. It is important to know that race is a social construct, rather than based in biology, which means that while it appears natural and factual it is actually largely reliant on the interpretation of the individual. In addition to having no biological, scientific basis, anthropologists do not use race as a definable category because our perceptions can so easily differentiate. Instead, we recognize that what is perceived as race (i.e., skin color), is due to our ancestor's adaptations to different environments. For example, lighter skin developed further away from equator to facilitate the absorption of vitamin D, while darker skin developed along the equator to protect from the sun's harsh UV rays. Further, rather than classifying or categorizing people based on race, we... read more ❯

Evolution at TMSE - Adapting Animals by Madeline Anscombe
Today at TMSE we taught the students all about the theory of evolution and let them see how this theory transcends into their own lives. Teaching evolution was an important topic to teach our third graders because not only is it important when dealing with anthropology, but it allows us to see how each individual is somehow tied together.   The lesson opened up with talking about the history of the theory and Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species which took 22 years to write! Our young anthropologists learned that because evolution is a theory, it has been tested hundreds and hundreds of times and has never been proven false. This gave us some validation in order to support some examples of how different animals are able to change given... read more ❯

Primates at TMSE! by Mary Gibler
This past week, our lesson at TSME focused on Primates. We taught the students that monkeys, apes, and humans are all primates, surprising the class with a picture of them that we had taken the previous week to demonstrate the concept. To distinguish between monkeys and apes, we discussed the presence of tails in monkeys (some of which are prehensile), not apes, and why that tail might be beneficial for smaller apes based on their arboreal environment. We showed the students Indonesian apes, including a loris, gibbons, macaques, a proboscis monkey, a javan lutung, and an orangutan. This helped the students understand the context of primates in their environment and why they can find certain types of primates in different places. We asked the students why we study primates, and concluded that studying primates helps us to learn how to better save the environment while also teaching us important concepts... read more ❯

Body Modification at TMSE by LaBethany Bradford
So this week at TMSE we learned about body modification! I was really excited to teach this class given that a lot of people think body modification is weird. But, it isn't! I had to remind the students throughout the presentation that we also do body modification on a regular basis and that it is normal. To begin, I went over CLAP one last time, which stands for the four subfields of anthropology: cultural, linguistic, archaeology and physical. I then reminded them about our lesson on archaeology from last week and how it is the study of past people by examining things they left behind. To start off with body modification, I asked them what they thought it was and they gave me great answers! I was very pleased that they said it is when you change your body or get a tattoo. I then further explained to them that body modification can also be... read more ❯

Archaeology, week 3! By LaBethany Bradford
For our third week at TMSE, we focused on Archaeology. But, before I started to teach them about archaeology I reviewed "CLAP." CLAP stands for Cultural, Linguistic, Archaeology, and Physical. While teaching them about different archaeological sites of Indonesia the children started to ask many good questions. They also had really great answers for the questions I asked. One student in particular said that archaeology was the study of culture using the things they might have left behind. They also made great connections with the pictures from different archaeological sites in Indonesia. The site Candi Sukuh, for example, was compared to the Mayan pyramids and one of the students let me know that they originated in Mexico. They knew a lot more about archaeology than we anticipated and they are learning to make connections between the things we are teaching them. Members of the Mighty Animal Dinosaurs carefully... read more ❯

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