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Mission
Published 6/6/2012 in Bama Anthro Blog Network
Author admin
This site is currently under construction, but in the coming days it will provide a forum for blogging by University of Alabama Anthropology students, faculty, and staff. Graduate students in Principles of Physical Anthropology will be blogging as part of the course in an effort to develop their disciplinary acumen with public anthropology as a core practice, not just a philosophy. As Patrick Dunleavy and Chris Gilson state, Blogging is, quite simply, one of the most important things that an academic should be doing right now. If you are not in this course but are affiliated with the UA Anthropology Department and would like to blog via this network, please contact cdlynn@ua.edu. read more ❯
Hello world!
Published 8/20/2012 in Brown Vs. The Blog of Education
Author ashleystewart
Welcome to Anthropology Blog Network Sites. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging! read more ❯
Mario Beauregard & the Mystical Mind
In a documentary about his work, The Mystical Brain (Raynauld 2006), neuroscientist Mario Beauregard states something to the effect that even when he was a child, he believed humans possessed some type of soul that was more than the sum of neuroanatomy. Indeed, Beauregard's work takes the vantage that spirituality is more than the neural networks. Mario Beauregard is a neuroscientist affiliated with the Department of Psychology at the University of Arizona. Beauregard received his Ph.D. from the University of Montreal, completed post-docs at the University of Texas Medical School & Montreal Neurological Institute at McGill, & has published a whole buncha science papers & two books, Brain Wars (2012) & The Spiritual Brain (2009). His research focus is on emotions & transcendent states, which he defines as "experiences that extend or lie beyond the limits of ordinary experience" (Beauregard 2011:63). In particular, Beauregard is interested in mystical experiences & cites William... read more ❯
PSA
Follow evolution public service announcements on Tumbler! read more ❯
PSA: About migration...
Published 8/12/2013 in The Monkey Speaks His Mind
Author Christopher Lynn
  Follow evolution public service announcements on Tumbler.     read more ❯
A Truly Unique PhD Program in Biocultural Medical Anthropology
Published 10/19/2013 in Biocultural Systematics
Author Christopher Lynn
The University of Alabama offers one of the few dedicated Biocultural Medical Anthropology doctoral programs in the United States.  We are currently accepting applications from qualified students.  Please visit our faculty page & feel free to contact us with any questions or to learn more. read more ❯
Blogging instructions
Published 8/11/2014 in Neuroanthropology: The Course
Author Christopher Lynn
Below is a video showing you how to post to this blog.  The first few seconds get cut off, but I think all I said was "Welcome to the Anthropology Blog Network. I'm going to show you how to post to the Neuroanthropology blog."  Let me know if you have any questions. http://youtu.be/0k5JlKTPOsk read more ❯
How do you remember Jewish lives when nothing remains?
Published 12/28/2014 in Uncovering Jewish Heritage
Author Marysia Galbraith
Author Marysia Galbraith has kindly let the Bama Anthro Blog Network repost from the original site here. A defining question of my study is turning out to be: How do you remember Jewish lives in Poland when nothing remains? Or when there are only scattered traces? I certainly started with next to nothing when I began the search for my own family story. Since then, I have found so much—most extraordinarily many living relatives. I’m gathering up the fragments of the past—a half remembered story, a photograph, a birth record. And pieced together, something fuller is emerging. It’s still impossibly far from the rich lives that have passed, but it nevertheless gives me a much better sense of where I come from. All this resonates with an article I read in the Atlantic, which although it is about the tension between science and belief in God, makes the point that the more knowledge... read more ❯
How I learned to think about race
Hi. My name is Jim Bindon and I’m an old white guy who wants to talk to you about race. I’d like to start by telling about my background on the subject. I grew up in San Francisco from the late 1940s to the late 1960s. While I was aware of segregated residential patterns it felt to me like there was an air of tolerance for difference in the city from Hunter's Point to Playland to Chinatown to Finocchio's drag club. In hindsight, I realize that was just my white privilege ignoring racism. When I was in grade school, the Hunter’s Point public housing project was built almost exclusively for blacks; earlier public housing projects had been almost exclusively reserved for whites. I didn’t know about this. I thought my high school class was diverse with Italian Catholics and Eastern European Jews and WASPs like me tracing back to England... read more ❯
Hello world!
Published 9/21/2015 in Confessions of a Hockey Anthropologist
Author dascott
Welcome to Anthropology Blog Network Sites. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging! read more ❯
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