ANT 670

Principles of Physical Anthropology

Dr. James R. Bindon
Article Critiques

TOPICS AND PRESENTATIONS

READINGS AND ASSIGNMENTS

Topics:

  • Organizational Meeting
  • What is Physical Anthropology and how did it get that way?
  • What are the conceptual underpinnings of modern physical anthropology?

Presentations available:

  1. History of Physical  Anthropology
  2. Molecular and Familial Genetics
  3. Population Genetics
  4. Evolutionary Theory
  5. Misconceptions in Evolution

Additional information:

Readings:

  • Graves, Intro, Ch. 1-9
  • Tattersall and Schwartz, Preface, Ch. 1, 2
  • Your physical anthropology text (YPAT): Intro chapter, chapters on genetics, cell biology, and evolution

Assignments:

  • Assignment 1: Edit your statement on our website using this link to tell about your background in anthropology, why you came to UA, who you're working with, and what you hope to do for your thesis research. (due ASAP)
  • Assignment 2: Genetics Problems (due 9/20: all assignments are due by noon on the assigned date)

Topics:

  • Primates
  • What is man’s place in nature?
  • Who are our closest relatives and what can we learn about ourselves from them?

Presentations available:

Readings:

  • Beard, whole book
  • Relethford, Preface, Ch. 1 – 2
  • YPAT: Chapters on Primates, taxonomy, behavior, evolution

Assignments:

Topics:

  • How do we differ from our closest relatives?
  • Where did we come from?
  • How did we get here?

Presentations available:

Readings:

  • Hart and Sussman, whole book.
  • Relethford, Preface, Ch. 3, 4
  • Tattersall and Schwartz, Ch. 3 - 8
  • YPAT: Chapters on fossil man, paleoanthropology

Assignments:

Topics:

  • How do we differ from one another?
  • What causes differences between groups of people?
  • How are human differences patterned?

Presentations available:

Additional Resources:
  • Baker, PT. 1984. The adaptive limits of human populations. Man, 19:1-14.

Readings:

  • Graves, whole book
  • Relethford, Ch. 5 – 10

Assignments:

Additional Resources:
  • Bindon JR. 1997 Coming of age of human adaptation studies in Samoa. In: R. Huss-Ashmore and S. Ulijaszek (editors). Human Adaptation. Oxford University Press. Pp. 126-156.
  • Brace, CL. The concept of race in physical anthropology.  In Ember and Ember.
  • Brown, Ryan A. and Armelagos, George J. (2001) Apportionment of Racial Diversity: A Review. Evolutionary Anthropology, 10:34-40.
  • Crews, D.E. and J.R. Bindon. 1991. Ethnicity as a taxonomic tool in biomedical and biosocial research. Ethnicity and Disease, 1:42-49.
  • Green L. 1993. G6PD deficiency as protection against falciparum malaria: an epidemiologic critique of population and experimental studies. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology, 36:153-178.
  • Livingstone FB. Anthropological implications of sickle cell gene distribution in West Africa.  American Anthropologist, 60:533-562.
  • Montagu A. 1962. The concept of race.  American Anthropologist, 64:919-928

Readings:  There are five required texts available from the bookstores:

  1. Beard, Chris 2004 The Hunt for the Dawn Monkey: Unearthing the Origins of Monkeys, Apes, and Humans University of California Press.
  2. Graves Joseph L., Jr. 2001. The Emperor's New Clothes: Biological Theories of Race at the Millenium.  Rutgers, NJ: Rutgers University Press.
  3. Hart, Donna, and Sussman Robert W. 2005 Man The Hunted: Primates, Predators, and Human Evolution. Westview Press.
  4. Tattersall Ian, and Schwartz Jeffrey H. 2001. Extinct Humans. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
  5. Relethford John H. 2003. Reflections of Our Past: How Human History is Revealed in Our Genes.  Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

In addition to these books, each student needs to choose an introductory text in biological anthropology from those made available by Dr. Bindon.  Finally, article assignments will be made available as needed.